Fournisseur désigné d’éducation à distance de l’Ontario

Centre d’études indépendantes

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Tous les cours de 12e année

English - ENG4U

Code du cours CEI : ENG4U-C

12e année, University Preparation, 1,0 crédit

Cours préalable
English (ENG3U-C)

Description de cours

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. You will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing

Journal électronique

Pour ce cours, il faut soumettre le travail en ligne en utilisant Microsoft Word © ou OpenOffice Writer.

Unit 1: What to Be or Not to Be

The focus of these units is on listening and media with reading and writing expectations included. The course begins with a study of Aeschylus, a classical laywright who was an idealist and a poet and whose work carries moral force even in the 21st century. What are the themes being dealt with? Whose narrative is it? How are culture, gender, time and place of significance in shaping that personal narrative? Using the Greek tragedy, students will determine the elements of a Greek tragedy that could be borrowed by other playwrights including Shakespeare. Students will watch the movie version of Hamlet and deconstruct the play by applying the elements of Greek tragedy to it. In the end students will make connections between the very different pieces studied in the units through the construction of a formal writing task.

Unit 2: How Is My Story Only My Story?

The focus of these units is on listening and media with reading and writing expectations included. The course begins with a study of Aeschylus, a classical laywright who was an idealist and a poet and whose work carries moral force even in the 21st century. What are the themes being dealt with? Whose narrative is it? How are culture, gender, time and place of significance in shaping that personal narrative? Using the Greek tragedy, students will determine the elements of a Greek tragedy that could be borrowed by other playwrights including Shakespeare. Students will watch the movie version of Hamlet and deconstruct the play by applying the elements of Greek tragedy to it. In the end students will make connections between the very different pieces studied in the units through the construction of a formal writing task.

Unit 3: How Are We Shaped by Culture, Time, and Place?

Students will choose to read one of the following: Karen Hesse’s Out of the Dust or Michael Ondaatje’s In the Skin of a Lion. Where the first two units focussed on the power and the devices of oral language to convey personal narrative, these next two units use the power and stylistic devices of literature as it primary focus. Students will prepare a stand-alone module that effectively teaches the work chosen. In addition to creating a basic reader’s guide for the work chosen, students will select additional informational, literary and graphic texts in order to create a companion reading piece to accompany the core text chosen and explain connections to the ideas presented in them. Students will create a vocabulary activity and a companion piece that creates context for the core text by examining author information, historical context information and ways to connect to the literature personally.

Unit 4: How Does Personal Narrative Reveal Identity?

Please note: Unit 4 is a continuation of Unit 3.

Students will choose to read one of the following: Karen Hesse’s Out of the Dust or Michael Ondaatje’s In the Skin of a Lion. Where the first two units focussed on the power and the devices of oral language to convey personal narrative, these next two units use the power and stylistic devices of literature as it primary focus. Students will prepare a stand-alone module that effectively teaches the work chosen. In addition to creating a basic reader’s guide for the work chosen, students will select additional informational, literary and graphic texts in order to create a companion reading piece to accompany the core text chosen and explain connections to the ideas presented in them. Students will create a vocabulary activity and a companion piece that creates context for the core text by examining author information, historical context information and ways to connect to the literature personally.

Unit 5: How Are We Shaped by Culture, Time, and Place

In this unit students will practice their speaking skills while exploring three significant movements in recent times— existentialism, modernism, and postmodernism. By deconstructing the characteristics of each movement students will develop some understanding of how they have influenced plays, poems, literature and media. Students will explore their presentation in a choice of films and television and analyze the applicability of the films to the movements in an oral presentation. The unit will end with the launch of the comparative novel study whereby students will choose one novel connected to our course theme and will prepare to compare it to two other pieces studied in the course. Once again in this unit, students will examine the overarching course theme: personal narrative as it reveals and shapes identity and the power of culture, gender, time and place in shaping that identity.

Unit 6: How Does Personal Narrative Reveal Identity? (Part A)

Students will select one of the following novels: Lloyd Jones' Mister Pip, Miriam Toews’ A Complicated Kindness or Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner. Students will complete reading responses and a character development chart which will be submitted at the end of Unit 7 along with a persuasive essay. Students will select one novel to read and make connections to at least two other works studied in the course using the overarching theme of the course to help develop a thesis about identity.

Unit 7: How Does Personal Narrative Reveal Identity? (Part B)

Please note: Unit 7 is a continuation of Unit 6.

Students will select one of the following novels: Lloyd Jones' Mister Pip, Miriam Toews’ A Complicated Kindness or Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner. Students will complete reading responses and a character development chart which will be submitted at the end of Unit 7 along with a persuasive essay. Students will select one novel to read and make connections to at least two other works studied in the course using the overarching theme of the course to help develop a thesis about identity.

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